Discussion:
"Pigeon pea". Why so named?
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Phred
2006-05-31 11:31:05 UTC
Permalink
G'day mates,

A question arose today about pigeon pea (still _Cajanus cajan_ to
me; but the taxonomists say it's now in _Atylosia_).

It was quite a simple question: "Why is pigeon pea called pigeon
pea?" [AKA "pigeonpea".]

I have to say, I'm damned if I know why! It's been pigeon pea to me
since I first met it 40 years ago, and I've never wondered why.

According to <http://www.thefreedictionary.com/pigeon+pea> it's simply
"From the use of its seeds as pigeon feed."

While that may well be true, it almost sounds *too* simplistic. After
all, the main use is for human food (red gram, toor dal, etc.)
especially in India.

So where and why has it become associated with bloody pigeons?
(An analogous question arises for "chickpea".)

Cheers, Phred.
--
***@THISyahoo.com.INVALID
Torsten Brinch
2006-06-01 10:11:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Phred
G'day mates,
A question arose today about pigeon pea (still _Cajanus cajan_ to
me; but the taxonomists say it's now in _Atylosia_).
It was quite a simple question: "Why is pigeon pea called pigeon
pea?" [AKA "pigeonpea".]
I have to say, I'm damned if I know why! It's been pigeon pea to me
since I first met it 40 years ago, and I've never wondered why.
According to <http://www.thefreedictionary.com/pigeon+pea> it's simply
"From the use of its seeds as pigeon feed."
While that may well be true, it almost sounds *too* simplistic. After
all, the main use is for human food (red gram, toor dal, etc.)
especially in India.
So where and why has it become associated with bloody pigeons?
I have no idea. Pass.
Post by Phred
(An analogous question arises for "chickpea".)
'Chick-pea' comes from French 'pois chiche'. It was originally
imported into English as the singular form 'chich-pease',
but the pommie ear naturally came to hear such a construction as
a plural form, so from it was synthesised the singular form
chich-pea. In the origin the French name 'pois chiche' has nothing
to do with chicken. 'Chiche' is from Latin 'cicer', which means ...
pea :-)
Phred
2006-06-01 15:19:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Torsten Brinch
Post by Phred
G'day mates,
A question arose today about pigeon pea (still _Cajanus cajan_ to
me; but the taxonomists say it's now in _Atylosia_).
It was quite a simple question: "Why is pigeon pea called pigeon
pea?" [AKA "pigeonpea".]
I have to say, I'm damned if I know why! It's been pigeon pea to me
since I first met it 40 years ago, and I've never wondered why.
According to <http://www.thefreedictionary.com/pigeon+pea> it's simply
"From the use of its seeds as pigeon feed."
While that may well be true, it almost sounds *too* simplistic. After
all, the main use is for human food (red gram, toor dal, etc.)
especially in India.
So where and why has it become associated with bloody pigeons?
I have no idea. Pass.
Post by Phred
(An analogous question arises for "chickpea".)
'Chick-pea' comes from French 'pois chiche'. It was originally
imported into English as the singular form 'chich-pease',
but the pommie ear naturally came to hear such a construction as
a plural form, so from it was synthesised the singular form
chich-pea. In the origin the French name 'pois chiche' has nothing
to do with chicken. 'Chiche' is from Latin 'cicer', which means ...
pea :-)
Thanks for that, Torsten. I wonder if, in years to come, we could
have the progression: pea pea --> pee pee --> wee wee? ;-)

Cheers, Phred.
--
***@THISyahoo.com.INVALID
Malcolm Manners
2006-06-02 00:34:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Phred
Post by Torsten Brinch
Post by Phred
G'day mates,
A question arose today about pigeon pea (still _Cajanus cajan_ to
me; but the taxonomists say it's now in _Atylosia_).
It was quite a simple question: "Why is pigeon pea called pigeon
pea?" [AKA "pigeonpea".]
I have to say, I'm damned if I know why! It's been pigeon pea to me
since I first met it 40 years ago, and I've never wondered why.
According to <http://www.thefreedictionary.com/pigeon+pea> it's simply
"From the use of its seeds as pigeon feed."
While that may well be true, it almost sounds *too* simplistic. After
all, the main use is for human food (red gram, toor dal, etc.)
especially in India.
So where and why has it become associated with bloody pigeons?
I have no idea. Pass.
Post by Phred
(An analogous question arises for "chickpea".)
'Chick-pea' comes from French 'pois chiche'. It was originally
imported into English as the singular form 'chich-pease',
but the pommie ear naturally came to hear such a construction as
a plural form, so from it was synthesised the singular form
chich-pea. In the origin the French name 'pois chiche' has nothing
to do with chicken. 'Chiche' is from Latin 'cicer', which means ...
pea :-)
Thanks for that, Torsten. I wonder if, in years to come, we could
have the progression: pea pea --> pee pee --> wee wee? ;-)
Cheers, Phred.
In central Florida, we have the Peace River, and one might think it was
named at the end of a war. However, the more likely story is that there
is a native Vicia that grows on its banks, and it was therefore
originally the Peas River.
Torsten Brinch
2006-06-02 09:31:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Phred
Thanks for that, Torsten. I wonder if, in years to come, we could
have the progression: pea pea --> pee pee --> wee wee? ;-)
Since pea and pee have in fact the same pronunciation, future
generations might well choose to conflate the spellings of the two.
If that happens mee thinks it might well have had consequences for
similarly spelled & pronounced words like wee..
donald haarmann
2006-06-03 22:29:36 UTC
Permalink
"Phred" <***@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:***@individual.net...
| G'day mates,
|
| A question arose today about pigeon pea (still _Cajanus cajan_ to
| me; but the taxonomists say it's now in _Atylosia_).
|
| It was quite a simple question: "Why is pigeon pea called pigeon
| pea?" [AKA "pigeonpea".]
|
| I have to say, I'm damned if I know why! It's been pigeon pea to me
| since I first met it 40 years ago, and I've never wondered why.
|
| According to <http://www.thefreedictionary.com/pigeon+pea> it's simply
| "From the use of its seeds as pigeon feed."
|
| While that may well be true, it almost sounds *too* simplistic. After
| all, the main use is for human food (red gram, toor dal, etc.)
| especially in India.
|
| So where and why has it become associated with bloody pigeons?
| (An analogous question arises for "chickpea".)
|
| Cheers, Phred.
|
|


----------
Ye old —

Weeds and Words : The Etymology of the Scientific Names of Weeds and Crops.
Robert L Zimdahl
Iowa St. U. Press, 1989.

Cicer arietinum L. Cicer (L) chickpea.

Ok. But why did the Romans call it "chickpea"?

----
Cajanus cajan (l.) Huth Pigeon pea

Canan: (L) prop. fr. Malay kachang = bean or pea; also pigeon pea.

"The generic and specific names have the same origin, which is unique among the plants
included herein. The names are not descriptive of looks or behavior, but the do reveal
what is in the language from which the name originated. Pigeon peas are cultivated
for their edible seeds in India and other semiarid tropical areas."

Say - what 'bout the pigeon- berry. Duranta repens L.?

LH Baley
Manual of Cultivated Plants
McMillian, 1949.
--
donald j haarmann
---------------------------
His talk was like a stream, which runs
With rapid change from rocks to roses;
It slipped from politics to puns,
It passes from Mahomet to Moses;
Beginning with the laws which keep
The Planets in their radian courses;
And ending with some precept deep
For dressing eels, or shoeing horses.

Winthrop Mackworth Praed
The Vicar
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